You’re Fired.

I posted a photo on my Instagram story with the caption being “I have been completely make up free for a week now because it is a lot cheaper if you would just love yourself”. No, I am not saying that if you wear make up then you don’t love yourself or that you have some major insecurity. I love make up and for everyone who knows me, they know this to be true. Luckily I didn’t get any negative comments towards my post but It really got me thinking about makeup in the work place so I put out a poll on my personal Facebook page asking if you think makeup should be required or optional. To no surprise to me, most people said it should be optional, however I then looked into the professions of the people who voted. Only 8 out of the 46 people over all who voted worked in Corporate America. 5 Out of the 8 that worked in Corporate America voted for makeup to be required. let me break that down: 83.33% of the people who voted for makeup to be required worked in Corporate America, while only 7.5% of people who voted for it to be optional worked in Corporate America. 62.5% of Corporate America workers who responded to my poll voted for makeup to be required. I am sure if I really wanted to do more research I should ask more people than just the few that I am actually friends on Facebook with, but all in all, I found this very intriguing

I did some research on the legalities of requiring make up in the work place. It didn’t take me long to find the law because apparently this is a pretty hot topic. Makeup is lumped into the Dress Code and Grooming Standard clause under the EEOC guidelines.  This clause addresses attire, tattoos, piercings, hygiene, and other various external attributes. It allows employers to set a neat and clean standard of appearance in their place of business. It goes on to state that employers are allowed to require makeup “as long as they bear a reasonable relationship to legitimate business needs and are enforced fairly (between genders and coworkers).” www.twc.state.tx.us

According to Chron.com “Employers can legally require women to wear makeup as part of an established dress code; they can impose such restrictions on female employees while not burdening male employees at a similar level. While some plaintiffs have tried to show that requiring women to wear makeup takes more time and costs more money, thus being a greater burden on women than men, these arguments have not proven successful as of the date of publication.”

Do you know how much I pay for foundation? $52! Yep… Even if I were to use my drug store foundation, it is still $12 just for the foundation. My makeup bag alone has over $250 worth of makeup in it and that’s not all high end items. In fact, most of it is drug store. Poeple.com predicted “that a woman spends $15,000 on beauty products in her lifetime.” Even that number seams very low to me. If you calculate that out from 22 years old to 65 years old (start to retirement) that comes out to only $41.67 per month. maybe if I wore only mascara and lipstick, sure.

Did you know that you can get passed up for a promotion or even demoted if you don’t comply with the Dress Code and Grooming Standard? Passed up, demoted, or fired… over make up?! Under the Correction Action Process this is how your boss can legally fire you for any act that violates dress code including makeup:

  1. oral and written warnings;
  2. probation;
  3. suspension with or without pay;
  4. disciplinary pay cuts;
  5. demotion or reassignment;
  6. final warning; and
  7. discharge.

www.twc.state.tx.us

What do you think? Support it or not?

 

Turning Your “Work Brain” Off

As someone who enjoys working and being busy, this was hard for me to grasp. When I am in something I am full force, pedal to the metal, submerged. This can be good in moments when I need to be attentive or exude a lot of energy, but also a down fall.


When you are growing up you have shift work jobs where you work 3 times a week, four hours at a time. When you get into corporate America, you work at least 40 hours a week, which breaks down to 8 hours a day of work and one hour a day for lunch. Although you technically work 40 hours you are away from home for at least 45 hours, not including your drive. On a “normal” week I leave my place at 6 am and get home around 5:15 pm. I generally pump myself up for work on my way there and decompress on my way home which means I am spending a little over 11 hours in work mode. IT IS HARD TO TURN OFF. I tend to find myself having a hard time clocking out mentally at 4 pm along with my body.

For the first couple months of my job in corporate, I dwelt on my work constantly. I couldn’t take my mind off of it. I was excited and ambitious but it led me down a rough road. I started getting irritable, I was waking up in the middle of the night with items I needed to add to my checklist, and I was panicking over everything I did.

I did hit my breaking point. I was exhausted, my co-worker had quit, we were hiring someone new, I never rested, I was working 10.5 hour days (not including the hour commute) and I couldn’t take my mind off work. My mental health had taken a serious hit. One day, I was sitting at work and felt my toes and hands starting to hurt. I looked down and there were red spots all over my feet! I went to the doctor, they took my blood pressure (which was through the roof), and found out that because of all the stress I was putting on myself, my immune system was low and I got hand, foot, and mouth disease.


This forced me to rest. I was out of work for four days and spent all day, every day, lying down. Awful, but glorious because I got so much rest! A mental vacation was what I needed. From that breaking point I have trained my brain to turn off of work mode. Mental breaks are not easy and it took practice believe it or not, but sometimes you have to choose not to think about something. here is how I did it:

  1. I started by actively doing something after work that I enjoyed, like blogging! TV and social media doesn’t do it for me, I don’t need something mindless, I need something that I can focus on that brings me joy and sweeps me away.
  2. I stopped talking about work on my free time. I still do this if something is bothering me but I try to make a conscious effort not to talk about it to fill space.
  3. I started planning events to look forward to so when I was stressed I could remember what I had planned that was going to be fun and NOT WORK!
  4. I stopped giving all of myself to everyone. When I did this I let in room to take care of myself, my husband, and my job. It became a lot easier to balance.

It gets better, but it does take time and effort.

Photography by Naomi Ledford:

https://www.facebook.com/naomiledfordphotography/

https://www.instagram.com/naomiledfordphotography/